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Historic life

Events

Coifs, caps, hats and hair How did cosmetics first become fashionable and how were they made? Learn how to use ‘rats’ in your hair and why a high forehead was the expected medieval image. With...

How did cosmetics first become fashionable and how were they made? Learn how to use ‘rats’ in your hair and why a high forehead was the expected medieval image. With ‘hands on’ experience using an extensive range of headwear from the Medieval through to Victorian periods. A basic introduction to centuries of womens’ headwear in England  – from headrails and wimples, to coifs and caps, hats and bonnets. We will look at the reasons for covering the hair – female modesty, religious proscription or simple practicality? Participants will make hairspray, face cream and simple cosmetics from the Elizabethan age!

 

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Medieval medicine chest Explore the ‘medieval mind’ and the houses where you may have lived and learn about the folk lore, customs, beliefs, medicinal ideas and how they were put into...

Explore the ‘medieval mind’ and the houses where you may have lived and learn about the folk lore, customs, beliefs, medicinal ideas and how they were put into practice. Make some things to protect you from the pestilence, cure a cold, ointments for sore joints and muscles and let us guide you through medical hierarchy and the most deadly diseases of the middle ages!

 

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